Tech

India Has Become The Call-Center Capital Of The World

 

In an unexpected twist of fate India has become the call-center capital of the world. Or is it truly so unexpected?

Call-centers have been around from time immemorial – figuratively speaking, of course. Call-centers in India have flourished to such an extent that they no longer have anything in common with the call-center infrastructure, which existed a decade ago. The fast-growing whirlwind of India’s scientific, technological, artistic, culinary, and pharmaceutical sectors helped the country achieve the world’s seventh largest GDP back in 2015!

The current economic development in India is truly enviable having in mind that the country is still facing constant setbacks in the face of poverty and poor public health care. Among the numerous sectors of this newly industrialized country are the IT industry and the telecommunication industry. India currently holds the top spots for the fastest growing IT and telecommunication sectors on the entire globe. Moreover, the BPO industry (or in other words, call-centers) is what’s giving this rapidly evolving country billions and billions of annual revenue.

Offshore and nearshore call-centers, also known as third-party outsourcing and captives in their respective order, are the two types of call-centers from which India is profiting. Captive call-centers, or nearshore call-centers, are a minority compared to the country’s offshore outsourcing system. Countless companies based in the US, the UK and other well-developed countries are relying on Indian-based call-centers to carry out their offshore outsourcing for a number of reasons. The rich abundance of labor force and the low salaries are the two main factors that have shaped India as the call-center capital of the world. Call-center representatives in India are being paid crumbs compared to what call-center workers in the US are receiving in terms of monthly salary.

Mobile phone contractors, credit card manufacturer and tech service providers are working with Indian call-center employees due to the fact that investing in offshore outsourcing is cheaper for them compared to setting up call-centers in their own countries. Mobile contractor and credit card call-center representative jobs are the most popular options for an Indian resident who happens to be looking for a job opening in the country. Furthermore, Bangalore’s own ITPL is the central hub of numerous IT companies, which are the culprits for the countless BPO-related job openings in India.

The BPO industry focuses on employing young, charismatic fresh meat, which often consists of undergrads who are willing to work nightshifts due to the time zone difference between India and the US. The low salaries of the call-center representatives in India are actually exciting and satisfactory for Indian residents as the costs of the living standards in India are sufficiently low compared to the ones in the US. Moreover, call-centers in India offer a picturesque variety of awesome benefits, such as teambuilding training, parties, workplace wellness programs, and other similar recreational activities. Call-center workers often receive monetary bonuses after they reach a pre-designated limit of sold goods or successfully struck contracts. This reason alone is yet another factor due to which India’s youth is willing to work at a call-center even when it comes to night shifts.

Due to the fact that BPO centers in India employ young, motivated workers, the workplace becomes a more vivacious, lively place where social interaction and offshore calls with international customers become an enticing reason for India’s youth to apply for call-center representative jobs. The constant flow of candidates and the low salaries are what drives international companies, who are looking to set up an offshore call-center for their products or services, to choose India as their call-center headquarters.

Having in mind all of the above stated factors, is it truly that surprising that India has become the call-center capital of our world? Or is this only the most obvious turn of events in a world where customer support is a crucial necessity?

About the author

Ijas Ahamed